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About Me

  1. County Highway S-2 is a desert road in south-central California with a fascinating history. Beginning at California Highway 79 near Warner Springs, the road leads south through the Anza-Borrego Desert in the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park. Known as the San Felipe Road, it is also known as Sweeny Pass, Imperial Highway and Great Overland Stage Route of 1849. The winding S-2 passes through Box Canyon and leads to the community of Ocotillo at Highway 8. Alongside the roadway the soft desert sand, rocks, ruts, and cacti provide a glimpse into the past and the difficulties that plagued wagon w

    © Today's Adventure

  2. Brian Klein

    Anza, California

    Anza is a census-designated place located in southern Riverside County, California, in the Anza Valley, a semi-arid region at a mean elevation of 3,921 feet above sea level.

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  3. Brian Klein

    Banning, California

    Banning is a city in Riverside County, California, United States. It is situated in the San Gorgonio Pass, also known as Banning Pass.

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  4. Two men who would feature in Santa Clarita Valley history — as allies — held opposing loyalties during the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848. Both Andrés Pico (as in Pico Canyon) and Edward F. "Ned" Beale (Beale's Cut, Tejon Ranch) played significant roles in the December 1846 Battle of San Pasqual, fought in proximity to an active Kumeyaay Indian village near the present city of Escondido in San Diego County. Bedrock mortars are found throughout the hills surrounding the battlefield, where a California State Historic Park visitors center tells the story of the battle and the broader war (in

    © Today's Adventure

  5. Brian Klein

    Glow of Amber

    As night falls, the dark cascades throughout the room; creeping, lurking. This cycle of life shows us all that death will eventually come; not even light is safe. However, even in darkness there is a hopeful glimmer of dimly-lit candle light, however grim, will always be there to guide us safely ashore bridging the ever widening chasm between the two cycles of life and death; in the end, it will be okay.

    © Today's Adventure

  6. Brian Klein

    Mysterious Egg

    What a Breakout Monster Egg looks like!

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  7. Brian Klein

    M1841 Cannon

    The M1841 6-pounder field gun was a bronze smoothbore muzzle-loading cannon that was adopted by the United States Army in 1841 and used from the Mexican–American War to the American Civil War. It fired a 6.1 lb (2.8 kg) round shot up to a distance of 1,523 yd (1,393 m) at 5° elevation. It could also fire canister shot and spherical case shot. The cannon proved very effective when employed by light artillery units during the Mexican–American War.

    © Today's Adventure

  8. Brian Klein

    Bridge

    A typical bridge created by the military in 1842

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  9. Brian Klein

    San Pasqual Wall

    San Pasqual Battlefield State Historic Park, east of Escondido, honors the soldiers who fought in the battle between the U.S. and Californio forces on December 6, 1846 in the midst of the Mexican-American War. Generals Stephen Kearny and Andrés Pico both claimed victory. The battle was only one of the military encounters in California in the war, but it proved to be the bloodiest and most controversial as to the outcome. The park has been set aside, not as a monument to war, but as a reminder of the human ideals, actions and passions that can drive nations to bloodshed.

    © Today's Adventure

  10. Brian Klein

    Candle Pot

    This was a generic candle creating pot used by the troops of the Mexican American War of 1842.

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  11. Brian Klein

    Adobe Building

    Adobe bricks are rectangular prisms small enough that they can quickly air dry individually without cracking. They can be subsequently assembled, with the application of adobe mud to bond the individual bricks into a structure. There is no standard size, with substantial variations over the years and in different regions. In some areas a popular size measured 8 by 4 by 12 inches (20 cm × 10 cm × 30 cm) weighing about 25 pounds (11 kg); in other contexts the size is 10 by 4 by 14 inches (25 cm × 10 cm × 36 cm) weighing about 35 pounds (16 kg).

    © Today's Adventure

  12. Brian Klein

    Rattle Warning

    Crotalus oreganus (often called the Western Rattlesnake) is the most common venomous snake in California, and is comprised of three subspecies: Crotalus oreganus helleri, Crotalus oreganus lutosus, and Crotalus oreganus oreganus. These snakes are found from sea level to an altitude of 8,200 ft.

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  13. Brian Klein

    Desert Rock

    A desert rock.

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  14. A plant indigenous to the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert in the Southwestern United States, and northern Mexico. Ocotillo is not a real cactus.

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  15. Brian Klein

    Rusty Barrel

    An old rusty barrel.

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  16. Lupinus arizonicus is a flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, native to the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts, where it can be found growing in open places and sandy washes below 1,100 metres elevation.

    © Today's Adventure

  17. Brian Klein

    Old Wagon

    The first stagecoach route that transported mail to the far west. The route covered 600 miles from St. Louis, Missouri to San Francisco, California. Prior to this, the mail was brought by ship through the Gulf of Mexico, across Panama by truck and again by ship up to California. The route was in operation from 1857-1861. Founded by John W. Butterfield and his associate William G. Fargo (better known as Wells Fargo), among others. Operations began when they won the coveted post office contract in 1857. They successfully delivered mail until the onset of the American Civil War in 1861. unfortuna

    © Today's Adventure

  18. The Cuyamaca Mountains, locally the Cuyamacas, are a mountain range of the Peninsular Ranges System, in San Diego County, southern California. The mountain range runs roughly northwest to southeast.

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  19. While marching to the conquest and occupation of California during the Mexican War, a detachment of 1st U.S. Dragoons, under the command of Brig. Gen. Stephen W. Kearny, was met on this site by native California lancers under, the command of Gen. Andres Pico. In this battle, fought on December 6, 1846, severe losses were incurred by the American forces. The native Californians withdrew after Kearny had rallied his men on the field. Gallant action on the part of both forces characterized the battle of San Pasqual, one of the significant actions during the Mexican War of 1846-1848.

    © Today's Adventure

  20. The Salton Sea is a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in the U.S. state of California's Imperial and Coachella valleys.

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  21. Brian Klein

    Anza-Borrego Plain

    Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is a California State Park located within the Colorado Desert of southern California, United States. The park takes its name from 18th century Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and Borrego, a Spanish word for sheep.

    © Today's Adventure

  22. Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is a California State Park located within the Colorado Desert of southern California, United States. The park takes its name from 18th century Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and Borrego, a Spanish word for sheep.

    © Today's Adventure

  23. Palomar Mountain is a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County. It is famous as the location of the Palomar Observatory and Hale Telescope, and known for the Palomar Mountain State Park.

    © Today's Adventure

  24. Palomar Mountain is a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County. It is famous as the location of the Palomar Observatory and Hale Telescope, and known for the Palomar Mountain State Park.

    © Today's Adventure

  25. A desert is a barren area of landscape where little precipitation occurs and, consequently, living conditions are hostile for plant and animal life. The lack of vegetation exposes the unprotected surface of the ground to the processes of denudation. About one-third of the land surface of the world is arid or semi-arid. This includes much of the polar regions where little precipitation occurs and which are sometimes called polar deserts or "cold deserts". Deserts can be classified by the amount of precipitation that falls, by the temperature that prevails, by the causes of desertification or by

    © Today's Adventure

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